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Case Studies

Learn how to improve your business from other audio describers and subtitlers.

Veronica Fyland (Great Britain)

"I have had the privilege of Audio Describing a wide range of Theatre in 3 prestigious regional Receiving and Producing Theatres…from panto to musical to drama to comedy…including productions for the National Theatre and RSC"

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Giuliana Sana (Italy)

My very first experience in the field of cultural accessibility dates back to 2008, when I was attending the professional Master in Screen Translation at the University of Bologna. 

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Forword (Italy)

The first contact with the world of accessibility took place during our training, about 10 years ago.

The attraction to subtitling for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (SDH) and for audio description (AD) for the blind was immediate, but we had to wait a few more years to actually start working in the field. At the time, there were fewer opportunities to get involved in this field.

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ArtisProject (Italy)

"As a professional, I started my business in 2003. At that time, my team only counted a few professionals. Now, in 2019, the company can rely on 15 in-house subtitlers and respeakers, 10 audiodescribers and a number of translators, free-lance subtitlers and voice talents"

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Marta Żaczkiewicz (Poland)

"When I decided to work professionally in the field of accessibility, first I set up a foundation, then my own business, and now I run them both. The main problem is to find customers. I’ve got some regular ones, but finding a new customer is quite hard"

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Izabela Mrochen (Poland)

"Accessibility issues and social and digital inclusion have started to be a part of my professional activities for a few years. I have been joining together a range of accessibility issues and at the same time I have been taking part in accessibility training in different countries"

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Agnieszka Walczak (Poland)

"I am working with clients from both private and public sector, mainly NGOs, TV stations, online platforms. In order to make my business sustainable, I am not focusing on offering one service only, but multiple services (subtitles, audio description, voice over) in three languages (Polish, English, Russian). Thanks to that my job is varied and rewarding"

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Lorna Heap (Great Britain)

"After studying theatre at University, I decided it was a priority of mine to ensure that as many people as possible would be able to access live performance, despite access barriers that they would usually face when visiting a theatre"

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Kaleidoscope - Maria Olalla Colmenero (Spain)

"When I think about the future of cultural accessibility, I’m 100% positive and confident. Laws are starting to be around and museums have to respect them. It’s unstoppable! I am sure the future is for all!"

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Rocío Méndez (Spain)

"There is still a lot of work to do, and many doors to knock on, but minds are opening and companies are changing their point of view on accessibility."

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Guillermo Sosa (Spain)

"I think that to improve the field of cultural accessibility and ensure greater business sustainability for those working in the sector we need to reach out people, new customers and society at large: they have to know these services."

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Tina Felicijan (Slovenia)

"Actually I am pretty new in the field. I came across cultural accessibility just recently and attending CASTLE lectures has made a significant contribution to it."

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Andreja Albreht (Slovenia)

"I think that professional work, everyday learning, and adjusting to what users need lead to sustainable business. This is what I have learned from my experience  I work manly with public customers, making complete accessibility solutions for public institutions and municipalities."

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